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45/2A3 to 1619 adaptor


I understand that someone has an adaptor available to sub in 1619 tubes in place of 2A3 and 45 tubes.
Now I suspect that the 1619 is triode connected (as it is a 2.5V 6L6), but would there be any other modifications required, other than the base adaptor,that any of you can think of?
TIA
FrankB


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No other modifications needed. I started using 1619's many years ago to replace 45's, no problems.D


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I think B Turner sells adapters and 1619 tubes:


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Thanks for the info guys.
I have a good stock of those tubes already, (so I will start making up my own adaptors. BTW- there was a company that made the adaptors in the WW2 (?)era "Sockettes" (sp).
I have a bunch of those, but not the one for the 45/2A3 as listed in their info papers.
Thanks All,
FrankB


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Check this thread, at the end you will find the instructions for making your own adapter. It is quite easy.Rich


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B Turner has 45. 50.and a solid state 83 listed on his website.
harvey_j

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Why not use triode connected 2A5?
Ron.


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Triode connected 2A5 may work, but then there is the problem of what to do with the cathode connection. One solution is to add two resistors in series across the filament pins on the 4-pin plug, connecting the cathode to the center point.
1619's are still usually less expensive than 2A5's are.D


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Thanks All,
Thanks for the info & the link!! I have 15-20 radios here I can now finally get going. I am fortunate enuf to a box full of those used, I can make adaptors for now!
Thanks Again to All.
FrankB


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I've got a basement full of tubes and don't recall every seeing a 1619. Where were they used and is there a source to look for them today? I'm doing a Wurlitzer amp. right now that takes four 45s.
Don
Don Van Diepen

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The 1619 was originally used in military radios, and there still seems to be a good supply of them around. 1619's are sometimes seen on eBay, and at ham and antique radio swap meets. Some of the online tube vendors should also have them. I picked up several of them at the MARC Lansing show last July for $2 apiece NOS.D


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The 1619 was the final tube in the BC603 and 684 tank transmitters. Huge numbers were made for spare parts, and there is no other known use for them, so many are still around, 60 years later.


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Is a 1619 a tall metal octal tube? Geeze I better pick them ujp when I see them before they go the way of 45s. I still think of an ad in I think Popular Electronics around 1964 offering tubes at 37 cents each or $35/100. I am sure they listed 2A3s and 45s.


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Sorry my time machine's not working--can't go back. Anyway being I'm a DIYer what value resistors would ya recommend for the cathode-heater. Looks like the 1619 would aslo have a need like the 2A5.
Don
Don Van Diepen

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Sorry: Just found out the 7AC basing diagram is not the right one for the 1619. Go to RCA info. It's correct.
Don Van Diepen

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Since the 1619 has no cathode but only the 2.5 volt filament, no added resistors are required. If you were going to try the 2A5, start with a couple of 100 ohm 2 watt resistors. Because the 45 uses a relatively high bias, there may also be a need to add a resistor from the grid to the cathode on the tube socket for the 2A5 to reduce the bias a bit.The 1619 seems to work fine without changing the bias. It would be nice to see the actual characteristic curve charts for the 1619, although it is widely reported to be a metal 6L6 with a 2.5 volt filament, and no cathode. Physically the tube appears identical to the metal 6L6, for those who have never seen one. I can only recall three tubes that used the large metal envelope, the 6L6, the 5T4, and the 1619, so they are easy to spot among a box of tubes.And apparently there are errors in some tube manuals about the basing of the 1619. D


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So is this guy all wet or right on with his
"drop in" statement?
Don Van Diepen

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Hi Don There are errors in some data books. These 1619's are filament type tubes and can not be used for 6L6 without changes as well as lower filament voltage.